Warning Indicators About Your Senior Canine’s Well being

However, it cannot be denied that older dogs face age-specific health problems. (And you will find that all of these conditions are common in the elderly as well.) Arthritis

Many older dogs develop osteoarthritis, the degeneration of the cartilage in the shoulders, hips, and leg joints. Perhaps the most common sign of arthritis is increased difficulty getting up after lying down or sitting. While there is no cure, there are some prescription medications that can provide great comfort to your dog, such as carprofen, deracoxib, meloxicam, and adequan. Some dogs also find pain relief from nonprescription supplements such as chondroitin and glucosamine. Cancers are very common in aging dogs, and many aren’t discovered until it’s too late. These are not the various lumps and bumps found in older dogs, most of which are completely harmless lipomas or fatty growths. Rather, they are malignant cancers that are potentially fatal. While many are hidden on internal organs, if you find a surface lump that affects you or becomes larger, it is well worth a trip to the vet.

Cancer hearing and vision problems

Heart disease, especially heart failure, is common in older dogs. This condition occurs when the heart cannot pump blood efficiently and fluid builds up in the heart, lungs, and chest cavity. As the owner, you need to pay special attention to possible signs of heart failure such as difficulty breathing, coughing, exercise intolerance, and unexplained vomiting. Immediate veterinary care is required. Heart disease

Obesity Like humans, most dogs develop some degree of hearing and vision loss as they age. These gradual changes usually go unnoticed until the condition progresses, and in general little can be done to correct them. The exception is surgical removal of cataracts, although the rest of the eye continues to age normally. As for hearing, you can help with a short circuit of hearing loss by regularly grooming and cleaning your dog’s ears.

Dementia Dogs can lose their cognitive function as they age, resulting in symptoms similar to the human conditions of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Cognitive dementia in dogs can lead to confusion, wandering and pacing, “caught” in corners, lost in familiar surroundings, and eliminated around the house. As with humans, there is no cure for dementia, but there are medications and supplements that can help in some cases. Talk to your veterinarian again for advice. You may not think that being overweight is a particular problem for older dogs, but as your puppy ages and their activity levels decline, obesity can have a profound impact on their health. Studies have shown that obese dogs are much more susceptible to diseases such as diabetes and certain types of cancer. In addition, the extra weight can worsen or even cause problems like arthritis, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

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