The Black Canine Institute problem for jewellers to boost funds for psychological well being contains Coastal jeweller | The Advocate

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Ulverstone jeweler Nicole Viney, three different materials, given two days’ notice while streamed live, took the Black Dog Institute’s challenge to design a custom ring set. Ms. Viney was one of four Australian jewelers to take part in the 15-Hour Bench Challenge, in which each one designed and made a piece of jewelry from the same materials. Each participant received eight grams of 18-carat yellow gold, seven grams of platinum and an oval aquamarine. The pieces will be auctioned by the Black Dog Institute to raise funds for mental health research. Ms. Viney said working with new materials like platinum was a hurdle she had encountered because the material was handled differently than gold. “While the concept was simple for a competition, it actually turned out to be more challenging and technical than I expected,” said Ms. Viney. “I really enjoyed working with the platinum when I got the feeling for it.” I’m super excited with the finished piece, I really like the way it turned out. “I would even like to bid my own bid at the auction because the finished piece looks fantastic.” IN OTHER NEWS: She said working 15 hours over two days takes a lot of focus. “I usually get up during the day and a little more because work usually requires you to sit fairly still.” It took a few days before I ended up in pain. “Ms. Viney said the livestream appeared to be a success, with around 150 people coming in from Australia, New Zealand and abroad throughout the day. The competitor’s livestream provided Ms. Viney with an opportunity to connect with other people who work in her craft. “I really enjoyed it. Working as a jeweler is pretty solo, you’re pretty much alone.” It was nice to have other jewelers competing, it’s nice to talk about work. “Ms. Viney said she was grateful for the opportunity to take part in the challenge of the Black Dog Institute. “At the jewelry bank you often get stuck in your own thoughts, we definitely have all of our days, especially in the last 12 months.” That is why participating in this competition was so rewarding. It felt good to know that I could do something that could help so many people. “She said the last four parts of the challenger would be judged on such things as build quality, use of materials that came with it, and design.” The parts could possibly Raise $ 20,000 if bids are for sale. “Why not subscribe to The Advocate? Sign up here.

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Ulverstone jeweler Nicole Viney, three different materials, given two days’ notice while streamed live, took the Black Dog Institute’s challenge to design a custom ring set.

Ms. Viney was one of four Australian jewelers to take part in the 15-Hour Bench Challenge, in which each one designed and made a piece of jewelry from the same materials.

Each participant received eight grams of 18-carat yellow gold, seven grams of platinum and an oval aquamarine.

The pieces will be auctioned by the Black Dog Institute to raise funds for mental health research.

Ms. Viney said working with new materials like platinum was a hurdle she had encountered because the material was handled differently than gold.

“While the concept was simple for a competition, it actually turned out to be more challenging and technical than I expected,” said Ms. Viney.

“I really enjoyed working with platinum as soon as I got the feeling for it.

“I’m super excited with the finished piece, I really like the way it turned out.

“I would even like to bid my own auction because the finished piece looks fantastic.”

She said working 15 hours over two days takes a lot of concentration.

“I usually get up during the day and a little more because work usually requires you to sit pretty still.

“It’s been a long couple of days, I ended up having a backache.”

Ms. Viney said the livestream was going to be a success. Around 150 people from Australia, New Zealand and abroad tuned in throughout the day.

The livestream of the participants gave Ms. Viney the opportunity to connect with other people who work in her craft.

“I really enjoyed it. Working as a jeweler is pretty much solo, you’re pretty much alone.

“It was nice to have other jewelers competing, it’s nice to talk about work.”

Ms. Viney said she was grateful for the opportunity to take part in the Black Dog Institute challenge.

“At the jewelry bank you often get stuck in your own thoughts, we definitely have all of our days, especially in the last 12 months.

“That’s why it was so rewarding to take part in this competition. It felt good to know that I could do something that could help so many people.”

She said the final four parts of the challenger would be judged on such criteria as build quality, use of materials supplied, and design.

“The pieces could potentially raise $ 20,000 in donations if the bids reach their retail value.”

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