Record-breaking $1.1 million awarded to College of Veterinary Medicine students – WSU Insider

The Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine awarded more than $1.1 million in internal funds to residents, interns, graduate students, and veterinary students in 2022.

The $1,149,139 in scholarships and other academic awards spread across 368 students breaks the college’s previous funding distribution record from 2021 by more than $250,000. While most students have received their awards, some awards for incoming students have yet to be announced.

“As a veterinarian who works in academia, I know first-hand just how invaluable and expensive a quality education can be,” said Dori Borjesson, WSU College of Veterinary Medicine dean. “We’re delighted to develop opportunities to support our students, and we know these scholarships help them focus and excel in the classroom and alleviate the burden student debt brings when veterinarians look to begin their career. Scholarships also model giving, and hopefully will inspire others to pay it forward.”

The college’s largest award award was the Elizabeth “Betty” Wilson Scholarship, awarded to a veterinary student interested in small animal medicine with a high academic ability, strong interpersonal skills, and leadership ability. The $44,000 scholarship was awarded to second-year veterinary student Elise Osmek.

“I feel so fortunate to be a part of a community that is dedicated to helping students succeed. Being a scholarship recipient makes me proud of all that I have accomplished in my vet school journey and the resiliency I have developed along the way,” Osmek said. “Having such generous donors is truly life changing for me and my classmates undertaking such a stressful financial burden, and it allows me to keep my focus on my studies and love for the field of veterinary medicine.”

The college’s second-largest scholarship awarded this year, the Penny Scripps Scholarship ($41,100), given to a student with a passion for small animal medicine, went to second-year veterinary student Jessica Lee.

the dr Carl Cozier Memorial Scholarship, awarded to Native American students who are enrolled as tribal members, went to second-year veterinary student Greta Gustafson.

“I am incredibly honored to receive the Dr. Carl Cozier Memorial Scholarship,” said Gustafson. “This scholarship allows me to focus on my education, rather than concerns about money, so that I can better serve my community by becoming the best veterinarian possible. I am incredibly grateful and express my sincere thank you to anyone who has played a role in helping students, like myself, achieve their dreams. It means more to us than I could ever express in words.”

Other noteworthy awards given this year include the Good Colleague Awards, monetary donations awarded to students who were nominated by their peers, and The COVID Sucks Scholarship, created in response to the pandemic and the resulting financial uncertainties.

This year there were two Good Colleague Award winners selected: third-year veterinary students Emily Violini and Alanna Wildman. Veterinary students Natalie Godinez, Emily Morse, and Lynn Short received The COVID Sucks Scholarship.