Michael Rothnie to take on Black Dog Institute’s Mullets For Mental Health initiative | Central Western Daily

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Michael Rothnie knows like everyone else what impact the black dog can have on a family. It was early 2019 when his younger brother Chris took his own life. The then 23-year-old remembered himself as someone with a good heart, tough competitive pressure on the soccer field and a passion for coffee. In the two years since that day, Mr Rothnie has done his best to advocate mental health and he will continue to do so in September. The Black Dog Institute’s Mullets For Mental Health is encouraging people to breed a mullet for the month of September, with the obvious goal of sparking discussion on the subject, but also to raise much-needed funding for mental health research. Suicide is the leading killer of Australians aged 15 to 44, and about 50 percent of people who report symptoms of mental illness do not seek help, says the Black Dog Institute. “It changed my perspective on the situation in life,” said Rothnie, looking back on 2019. “If I can spread awareness and save a life or two, then I’ve done my part.” The institute raises money for programs for people who are going through a difficult time and right now, in times of COVID, times are tough and people may need this more than ever. “It’s a great initiative to get on board and create awareness.” Mr Rothnie said Paul McDonald of the Orange Tigers brought the initiative to his attention last month and he thought he’d take the chance to embrace the often-maligned hairstyle. And with barbershops across Orange currently closed due to the lockdown across NSW, it’s likely that his mullet will be particularly outrageous. “It’s pretty out of line at the moment. I’m glad I started early, ”laughed the 27-year-old. “How good is a home job … and it’s free too. Hopefully I can clean it up someday.” Member of Orange Phil Donato is also a passionate advocate of mental health awareness and supports the initiative. Mr Rothnie said he had spoken to the Orange MP about the project and was keen to join forces to promote the problem across the region. However, COVID has put an end to gatherings and events that can help raise funds for the institute. “There’s not much we can do right now, but if we can create some awareness, we’re on the right track,” said Rothnie. Our journalists work hard to provide the community with local, breaking news. Here’s how you can still access our trusted content:

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September 5, 2021 – 2:28 pm

Michael Rothnie, like everyone else, knows what impact the black dog can have on a family.

It was early 2019 when his younger brother Chris took his own life. The then 23-year-old remembered himself as someone with a good heart, tough competitive pressure on the soccer field and a passion for coffee.

In the two years since that day, Mr Rothnie has done his best to advocate mental health and he will continue to do so in September.

If I can spread awareness and save a life or two, then I’ve done my part.

Michael Rothnie

The Black Dog Institute’s Mullets For Mental Health is encouraging people to breed a mullet for the month of September, with the obvious goal of sparking discussion on the subject, but also to raise much-needed funding for mental health research.

Suicide is the leading killer of Australians aged 15 to 44, and about 50 percent of people who report symptoms of mental illness do not seek help, says the Black Dog Institute.

“It changed my perspective on the situation in life,” said Rothnie, looking back on 2019.

“If I can spread awareness and save a life or two, then I’ve done my part.

“The institute is raising money for programs for people who are going through tough times, and especially now with COVID, times are tough and people may need this more than ever.

“It’s a great initiative to get on board and raise awareness about it.”

Mr Rothnie said Paul McDonald of the Orange Tigers brought the initiative to his attention last month, and he thought he’d take the chance to embrace the often-maligned hairstyle.

And with barbershops across Orange currently closed due to the lockdown across NSW, it’s likely that his mullet will be particularly outrageous.

“It’s pretty lopsided at the moment. I’m glad I started early,” laughed the 27-year-old.

“How good is a home job … and it’s free too. Hopefully I can clean it up someday.”

Member of Orange Phil Donato is also a passionate advocate of mental health awareness and supports the initiative.

Mr Rothnie said he had spoken to the Orange MP about the project and was keen to join forces to promote the problem across the region.

However, COVID has put an end to gatherings and events that can help raise funds for the institute.

“There’s not much we can do right now, but if we can create some awareness we’re on the right track,” said Rothnie

Our journalists work hard to bring local, breaking news to the community. Here’s how you can still access our trusted content: