In case your cat needs to depart the home, it could not such as you – Nanaimo Information Bulletin

To the editor,

Subject: Bylaws Will Lead to Leaving the Cat, Letters, January 27th.

The cat came back. Back to a loving home. If your cat has to run away from your house, it won’t like you.

A good reason for the statute is that cat poop can be dangerous to human health because it contains pathogens and parasites.

This statute will bring Nanaimo into harmony with other island and world communities that have it. After the shock, this statute has proven to be the “cat’s meow” and works great in these other communities.

Kudos to the mayor and council, who vote yes for this statute.

Neil Saunders, Nanaimo

RELATED: Nanaimo City Council Adopts Three Readings Of The Animal Statute That Restrict Cats From Roaming

To the editor,

How stressful is it just to keep your cat indoors? We always had cats, and they were always house cats and lucky cats. None of them were hit by cars or poisoned by a crazy neighbor. It is not their right to hunt and kill. Some prospects, humans, they are not tigers, just small domesticated cats. Your “right” is to be safe. From dogs, poison, cars, wildlife, etc. You don’t like it when a dog shits in your yard, but you think your neighbors should shut up if your cat does it in their yard. I have cat poop all over my yard, not just in the yard, and they don’t bury it all the time, and when they do, dogs will dig it up, eat it, and get sick. I hate having my hands in it when I’m gardening and shouldn’t have to because someone doesn’t want to clean the litter box. Be responsible for your animals no matter what they are or don’t get them.

And if people wanted to leave their cats just because of that, they had nothing to do with getting a pet in the first place. Stop tricking other people into handling your pets. We are also no longer allowed to let our dogs run around and they are much safer for it. This is the right step for the city in terms of cats and their safety. The owners can just adjust to it like we did for dogs.

Debbie Gunderson, Nanaimo

RELATED: Nanaimo City Councils are voting to recommend bylaws that discourage cats from roaming

To the editor,

I have had cats my whole life, and they always roamed free – until 1972 when I lost two of them to incredibly horrific deaths. The first cat got up in the neighbor’s car engine, which is common for outdoor cats looking for a warm place to rest. The second cat fell victim to rat poison.

Since then I have protected my cats by keeping them indoors. They live a long life – one lived up to 19 years – and it gives me great security to know that they are not exposed to poisons, are shot at, get up in cars, kill birds or annoy neighbors. You yourself are protected from injury by fighting other cats, getting diseases and parasites. This makes them much cleaner and always welcome in my bed. It’s a win-win situation for me.

Diana Walker, Nanaimo

RELATED: “Voluminous” Public Response Causes the City of Nanaimo to Postpone the Animal Responsibility Statute

To the editor,

I grew up in England during World War II. Back then we never had so much food for animals as we do today. We could only give them a small saucer of milk a day. Their only choice to eat was mice and rats etc.

All of our animals were our family. I believe cats have always been cleaner than dogs. When they went outside to their toilet, they used the floor and it was always their habit to cover it.

Fifty-four years ago when I moved to northern BC every animal was completely in the wild. Years later, while traveling to Alberta, I saw wire tunnels stretching across the gardens. I was amazed to hear it was because of a statute for cats. It was the only place they could go out to get some fresh air. For me it was pure cruelty. This world has animals that were here before we came. You should have the freedom we always seem to ask for.

Patricia Cook, Nanaimo

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Pet Statute an “Anti-Animal Act”

The views and opinions expressed in this letter to the editor are those of the author and do not reflect the views of Black Press or the Nanaimo News Bulletin.

Mail policy: Letters should not be longer than 250 words and will be processed. Letters that comment on issues of local relevance or reply to articles published in the News Bulletin are preferred. Include your address (it will not be published), a first name or two, and a last name. Unsigned letters or letters specifically addressed to other people will not be published.

Mail: Letters, Nanaimo News Bulletin, 777 Poplar St., Nanaimo, BC V9S 2H7

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E-mail: editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Letters to the editor

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