CSU vet college students run to lift cash for Black Canine Institute | Each day Liberal

news, local news, wagga, csu-vet, lucy-irish, mental health, black dog institute, zoe-mcdonald

University veterinary students are knocking on the sidewalk to raise money for mental illnesses like depression, which are chronically over-represented in veterinary medicine. The finish line is almost in sight of Charles Sturt University students, who ran daily throughout May to raise funds for the Black Dog Institute. They have already far exceeded their goal by raising $ 5,800, a substantial amount more than their original goal of $ 1,000. This month they also sparked several heart-to-heart conversations among themselves during their walks and runs. ALSO READ: Freshman Veterinarian Zoe McDonald said it was a matter close to their hearts as many people on campus have been directly or indirectly touched by suicide. “In recent years in particular, there have been a number of former CSU graduates who have committed suicide. You can talk to the staff here and everyone knows someone who has done that,” said McDonald. “We choose this profession and now want to change it for the better. Exercise is important for our own mental health, especially if we study for a long time.” Lucy Irish, a fourth year student, said she has family members who have faced mental health issues in their own lives. She also has several friends on her course who have been making it tough lately, and she has spoken to them during their runs. Ms. Irish said she knew that her dream job can sometimes be a mentally tough job and she wanted people to be prepared for the difficulties ahead. “Veterinarians put a lot of pressure on themselves and take on the mental, physical and emotional strain that comes with every case,” said Ms. Irish. “If the results are not what they are hoping for, you have to take care of your patients, but then you have to take care of the customers. There are so many people to give and sometimes you go out. “I know burnout, both emotionally and physically, it’s all such a big part of veterinary science.” If you or someone you know needs help, call Lifeline at 13 11 14 or Kids Helpline at 1800 551 800 . Do you have something? We look forward to your letters, which can appear both in print and online.

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University veterinary students are knocking on the sidewalk to raise money for mental illnesses like depression, which are chronically over-represented in veterinary medicine.

The finish line is almost in sight for Charles Sturt University students, who walk daily throughout May to raise funds for the Black Dog Institute.

They have already far exceeded their goal by raising $ 5,800, a substantial amount more than their original goal of $ 1,000.

This month they also sparked several heart-to-heart conversations among themselves during their walks and runs.

Freshman veterinary student Zoe McDonald said this was a concern of the heart as many people on campus had been directly or indirectly touched by suicide.

“In recent years in particular, there have been a number of former CSU graduates who have committed suicide. You can talk to the staff here and everyone knows someone who has done that,” said McDonald.

“We choose this profession and now want to change it for the better. Exercise is important for our own mental health, especially if we study for a long time.”

Lucy Irish, a fourth year student, said she has family members who have faced mental health issues in their own lives.

She also has several friends on her course who are having a tough time lately and she has chatted with them during their runs.

Ms. Irish said she knew that her dream job can sometimes be a mentally tough one and she wanted people to be prepared for the difficulties ahead.

“Veterinarians put a lot of pressure on themselves and take on the mental, physical and emotional strain that comes with every case,” said Ms. Irish.

“If the results are not what they are hoping for, you have to take care of your patients, but then you have to take care of the customers. There are so many people to give and sometimes you go out.

“I know burnout, both emotionally and physically, it’s all such a big part of veterinary science.”

If you or someone you know needs help, contact Lifeline at 13 11 14 or Children’s hotline at 1800 551 800.

Do you have something to say? We look forward to your letters, which can appear both in print and online.