Canine-walking: Some say make it legislation

Dog lovers certainly don’t need National Pet Month to be reminded that pooch pampering benefits parents as much as puppies.

CDC health professionals and innumerable veterinarians vouch for the many health benefits of owning a pet. Pet companions help manage loneliness and depression. Research has found that grooming and bonding with pets is less stressful and lowers blood pressure, as well as lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

A dog is also an opportunity to exercise, go outside, and socialize. These benefits are just as needed by pooches as they are by parents, so a recent survey found that 1 in 4 Idahoans think walking your dog should be a law.

The results of MyPetNeedsThat.com’s survey of 3,000 respondents include:

A quarter (25 percent) of Idahoans believe there should be state law requiring dogs to take daily walks to ensure dogs are getting enough exercise. Sedentary lifestyle negatively impacts pet health, including restlessness, boredom, and frustration. Increased risk of weight gain and withdrawal from daily activities.

Almost half (43 percent) of those surveyed believe that owners who do not let their dogs walk should be excluded from ownership.

More than half (54 percent) think it should be illegal to shackle dogs for more than an hour.

More than a third (34 percent) of Idaho respondents said they would report a neighbor who has never trained their dog to authorities. America’s obesity epidemic is mirroring many of our pets, veterinarians warn.

Almost one in five respondents believe that dog ownership should be limited by law to no more than three dogs, as more can be harder to take care of. Owning a pet sometimes takes more time, effort, cost, and dedication to properly care for it than some potential adopters realize.

When planning adoption, it is important to research the specific needs of the breed and pet.

How long will this animal live and how big will it get? What are their diet and exercise needs? How much does it cost for veterinary care? How much time and attention do you need to be healthy? What kind of habitat? Are pets allowed in this house or apartment?

Also, remember that people end up. Are there young children, the elderly, or people with weak immune systems who take care of or are around the pet?

The very young, the very old, and the immunocompromised (including some pregnant women) are more susceptible to zoonotic diseases or certain aspects of animal care, such as: B. a litter box.

Veterinarians are a great resource for choosing the best species of pets, as well as the Kootenai Humane Society 208-772-4019 and other animal shelters.

For more information, visit cdc.gov/healthypets and Mypetneedsthat.com/paw-and-order.

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Sholeh Patrick is a columnist for the Hagadone News Network, whose canine cats are known for going for a walk (half a block) and picking up a squish ball. Email Sholeh@cdapress.com.