Adelaide girl convicted, fined after ravenous canine to dying

The bitch was emaciated when the inspectors discovered her. Image: RSPCA

A woman cruelly starved two young Siberian huskies before one ate the other’s emaciated corpse.

An RSPCA inspector found a deceased ten-month-old male dog with a partially eaten body and an emaciated ten-month-old female while inspecting the woman’s house in September 2019.

The RSPCA believes the surviving dog consumed the deceased dog’s body in desperation after a veterinary report found the dogs had been inadequately fed at least two weeks earlier.

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During a trial, the 31-year-old Adelaide woman, who was responsible for caring for the animals, was fined $ 1,141 and placed on a two-year conduct guarantee for her treatment.

The defendant informed the inspector that she had been away for a few days without arranging for the dogs to be looked after in her absence.

The woman claimed to have set up a bowl of dog food and a container of water, but the inspector could not find any food bowls or water containers in the yard.

The RSPCA suspects that the bitch ate a second deceased dog out of desperation. Image: Barb Seidel / RSPCA

Judge Teresa Anderson described the dogs’ condition as “shocking” and said the defendant only had the dogs in her care for a short time before neglecting them.

She said the defendant must “not be responsible for animals” and imposed a ban that forbade the defendant from possessing animals until further notice.

The defendant was sentenced to three months’ suspended prison sentence because she had no history of animal abuse and because of her personal circumstances.

Within three weeks under the care of RSPCA South Australia, the female dog Stormy gained 76 percent of her original body weight and eventually regained full health before finding a home in November 2019.

The ten-month-old bitch Stormy was housed again after her recovery.  Image: RSPCAThe ten-month-old bitch Stormy was housed again after her recovery. Image: RSPCA

RSPCA South Australia’s Chief Inspector Andrea Lewis described the case as an example of people taking in dogs without acknowledging the responsibilities associated with pet ownership.

“It is totally unacceptable to go out and not make arrangements to care for your animals,” said Ms. Lewis.

“This is an extreme case of neglect with tragic consequences and begs the question why this person chose dogs in the first place, especially dogs of this breed with their high need for grooming, exercise and nutrition.

“We urge people not to purchase animals unless they understand and accept what is required to properly look after them, both physically and mentally.”

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