2021 Black Canine Journey takes off regardless of rain, wind, storms | The Day by day Advertiser

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The rain kept some riders in check for the annual Black Dog Ride through the Riverina, but organizers still expect the same generosity for their cause. About 70 drivers started their journey from Gumly on Sunday morning. There were typically up to 200 drivers, and even this year 180 had registered online. With up to 11 mm of precipitation until 9 a.m., the start had to be delayed and the route to Collingullie was revised to avoid the worst weather. In a normal year, riders from all over the nation would be participating in the one-day. But this year, as the storms continued to hit much of the state, Wagga’s ride was one of the few that actually managed to keep going. “As far as I know, only Dubbo and Condobolin could take part,” said organizer Nerolie Falconer. Ms. Falconer and her co-organizer and husband Graham “Bear” Falconer have been riding the Black Dog Ride every year since 2016 for suicide prevention. However, this was the first time they negotiated such wild terms. “I [was] a little bit nervous. I’ve only made two trips, not many in the wet, “said Ms. Falconer.” When it rains it is important to drive to the conditions. Everyone in my situation should take it easy. It’s not a race. “When the drivers arrived on Sunday morning, there were some students among them, but the majority of those who turned out were experienced enough not to be put off by the rain and strong winds.” We had a few Sydney drivers who are going to join us, but obviously they have been flooded, “Ms Falconer said. Despite the lower turnout, organizers are still reckoning with around $ 6,000 on suicide prevention.” The cause is the reason we I’m here. It’s what holds us together, that’s why so many showed up in the rain in the first place, “said Ms. Falconer. This is a matter close to John Wilson’s heart. The Wagga driver has attended the annual event for the year for the past five years. “I had a sister who died of suicide in 2000, 21 years ago,” said Wilson. “It’s always on your head, you always think about it, but that’s why something like this is important.” That independent state member Dr. Joe McGirr officially opened the ride, noting the symbolic properties of the weather conditions. “When you look outside, you think,” Yeah, this looks like what a depression feels like, “and this is what it looks like with the black man at Dog Ride it’s about that, “said Dr. McGirr. Frank and Vickie Zacka from Wagga took part in their first Black Dog Ride. The Zackas, who regularly travel to Sydney’s riding community, moved to Wagga in 2009. “We haven’t had a bike since we moved when we bought one in November [last year] We thought this trip would be a good opportunity, “said Mr. Zacka.” I have been driving since I was 16 and 9 months old. The rain is always a risk, but only if you allow it do you need to drive safely regardless of the weather. “If you or someone you know needs help, please contact: …

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The rain kept some riders in check for the annual Black Dog Ride through the Riverina, but organizers still expect the same generosity for their cause.

About 70 drivers started their journey from Gumly on Sunday morning. There were typically up to 200 drivers, and even this year 180 had registered online.

With up to 11 mm of precipitation until 9 a.m., the start had to be delayed and the route to Collingullie was revised to avoid the worst weather.

In a normal year, riders from all over the nation would be participating in the one-day. But this year, as the storms continued to hit much of the state, Wagga’s ride was one of the few that actually managed to keep going.

“As far as I know, only Dubbo and Condobolin could take part,” said organizer Nerolie Falconer.

Ms. Falconer and her co-organizer and husband Graham “Bear” Falconer have been riding the Black Dog Ride every year for suicide prevention since 2016. However, this was the first time they negotiated such wild terms.

“I [was] a little bit nervous. I’ve only made two trips, not many in the wet, “said Ms. Falconer.

“In the rain it is important to drive to the conditions. Everyone in my situation should take it easy. It is not a race.”

Graeme Hurst and Glen Dal Broi from Griffith.

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Pictures: Emma Horn

When the drivers arrived on Sunday morning there were some learners among them, but the majority of those who turned out were experienced enough not to be put off by the rain and strong winds.

“We had some Sydney riders who wanted to join us, but they obviously got flooded,” said Ms. Falconer.

Despite the lower turnout, organizers still expect to raise about $ 6,000 on suicide prevention.

“The cause is the reason we’re here. It’s what holds us together. That’s why so many showed up in the rain in the first place,” Ms. Falconer said.

The cause is particularly close to the heart of John Wilson. The Wagga driver has been participating in the annual event for five years.

“I had a sister who died of suicide in 2000, 21 years ago,” said Wilson.

“It’s always in your head, you always think about it, but that’s why it’s so important.”

The independent state member Dr. Joe McGirr officially opened the ride, noting the symbolic properties of the weather conditions.

“When you look outside, you think, ‘Yes, this is what depression looks like,’ and that’s what the Black Dog Ride is all about,” said Dr. McGirr.

Frank and Vickie Zacka from Wagga took part in their first Black Dog Ride. The Zackas, regulars in Sydney’s riding community, moved to Wagga in 2009.

“We haven’t had a bike since we moved when we bought one in November [last year] We thought this trip would be a good opportunity, “said Zacka.

“I’ve been driving since I was 16 and 9 months old. The rain is always a risk, but you only have to drive safely in all weathers if you allow it.”

If you or someone you know needs help, please contact: